How did Cleopatra use Mark Antony and Caesar as a political strategy for her throne?

Posted on October 7th, 2010 by admin1 in political strategy

I want to develop an understanding on this question as to what her aims and results were within her love affairs……and also whether this was seen as a political strategy at all?

She used Caesar as a means of deposing her brother and seizing sole control of the crown of Egypt.

She later seduced Antony to help her regain the lost provinces of the Ptolemaic empire in the Levant.

3 Comments on “How did Cleopatra use Mark Antony and Caesar as a political strategy for her throne?”

  1. David

    She didn’t! Cleopatra, if you have researched her, was one of the most unsuccessful and least divine of all the pharoahs, her reign was ruled by famine, disease and unpopularity. She whored around to sell her kingdom in order to save herself, in modern-times we call a person like that a rat!References : McCullough, Colleen. Caesar: A Novel.,
    Avon Books.
    New York, Ny
    1997

  2. Will

    She used Caesar as a means of deposing her brother and seizing sole control of the crown of Egypt.

    She later seduced Antony to help her regain the lost provinces of the Ptolemaic empire in the Levant.References :

  3. James5678

    First, the backdrop. In 51BC, Ptolemy XII, Cleopatra’s father died, leaving 4 remaining children. Following the tradition of the time, the oldest son, Ptolemy XIII (aged 10) married the oldest daughter, Cleopatra (aged 18). No one was happy with this and all wanted more power. Ptolemy and his courtiers ultimately threw Cleopatra out of Egypt into exile.

    A year later, Julius Caesar arrived in Egypt, pursuing Pompey who had fled there and with whom he had been fighting a civil war. Caesar had his eye on Egypt’s wealth and was eager to see Egypt as a client state or colony of Rome, so it was in his interest to have a friendly ruler there. Cleopatra smuggled herself into the palace at Alexandria (allegedly in a rug) and worked her charms on Caesar. He was soon smitten and under the terms of their father’s will, forced Ptolemy XIII to share the throne with Cleopatra. Ptolemy XIII wasn’t having this and when he ordered the Egyptian army to attack Caesar and the royal palace, Caesar had him put under arrest. One of Cleopatra’s other siblings, Arsinoe escaped to join the army.

    Knowing the likely outcome would be a Roman victory, Cleopatra persuaded Caesar to release Ptolemy to his army and with reinforcements from Rome, Caesar defeated the Egyptian army and Ptolemy himself drowned in the Nile. Arsinoe was exiled and the other brother Ptolemy XIV was poisoned mysteriously. With Caesar’s support, there then followed a series of executions of anyone hostile to Cleopatra. She was now undisputed queen of Egypt.

    After Caesar was murdered in Rome, Cleopatra simply switched her focus to his second in command, Mark Anthony and employed the same tactics. By now, the two main men in Rome were Anthony and Octavian – Anthony with responsibility for the Eastern Mediterranean, and Octavian for the West, including Italy. It was never an easy alliance between Octavian and Anthony. Wanting to see the back of Octavian, Cleopatra goaded Anthony into provoking civil war with him: marrying him under Egyptian law when he was married to Octavian’s sister, having their children named in his will, persuading him to cede Roman territory to her. This led to war, which ultimately Octavian won following a sea battle off Actium in Greece.

    Cleopatra then tried her charms again on the cool, calculating Octavian but he would have none of it and seeing everything lost, she committed suicide.

    To sum up: Cleopatra used Caesar to secure the throne of Egypt. She then thought she could split the Roman world in two using Anthony and extend Egypt’s power right across the Eastern Mediterranean and perhaps to Rome itself.References :

Leave a Reply

More News